Follow the 3Ws and do your Daily Health Check before leaving your residence hall or coming to campus.

Click here for the latest university COVID-19 updates.

For details about Student Affairs operations, see the Student Affairs Covid-19 Response. Updated August 21, 2020 at 9:00 a.m.

Signs to Look For

If you are concerned about a friend but aren’t sure if they need help, below are some signs to look out for. This list is not comprehensive, so if you need more guidance, please contact the Counseling Center or talk more with your friend about what they are experiencing.

 

  • Expressions of hopelessness (e.g. “There’s no point in even trying,” “Nothing matters”)
  • Statements about death or suicide (e.g. “I wish I were dead,” “You would be better off without me”)
  • Statements about wanting to harm others
  • Self-injury (e.g. cutting, scratching, or burning)
  • Unusual or significant changes in mood
  • Major changes in sleep, eating patterns, weight, or hygiene
  • Difficulties with memory, attention, or concentration
  • Lack of energy or motivation
  • Loss of interest in activities
  • Excessive tension or worry
  • Unusual restlessness, irritability, or hyperactivity; behaving recklessly
  • Excessive alcohol or drug use
  • Decline in academic performance or drop in class attendance
  • Social isolation or withdrawal 
  • Paranoid thinking or unusual/bizarre behavior or speech
  • Avoidance of certain places or situations, or fear of being alone

Emergency Services

The Counseling Center offers after-hours emergency coverage for urgent mental health concerns such as suicidal thoughts, sexual assault, and other trauma.  Call the Counseling Center at 828-262-3180 and select the option to speak with the counselor on-call.

For additional resources see our Emergency Services page.

Prevent Suicide Block

ScreeningButton